Archive for the ‘Google’ Category

Recap: Enterprise SaaS Working Group – Identity Management in the Cloud

December 4, 2009

We had a great second meeting of the Enterprise SaaS Working Group this week, which focused on the topic of access and identity management for the cloud.  Participants in the session included Chris Bedi from VeriSign, Peter Dapkus from  Salesforce.com, Ryan Nichols from Appirio (who also provided a great summary of the event on the Appirio blog), Steve Coplan from  The 451 Group, Michael Amend from Dell, Doug Harr from Ingres and Scott Carruth from Initiate Systems.   Our initial discussion focused on the unique management challenges created by SaaS and cloud applications due to the the identity silos they create in the enterprise as shown below.

Cloud identity in the enterprise

The ensuing roundtable discussion focused on the impact these issues are having in the enterprises, with a particular focus on the following topics:

  • Speed bump or show stopper – on the question of whether access and identity management issues were a going to be a ‘speed bump’ or ‘show stopper’ for SaaS adoption in the enterprise, the answer really revolved around timing and depth of penetration.  While today it is more of a speed bump for initial adoption in the enterprise (or else we wouldn’t be seeing enterprise deals today), the issues become more problematic when considering what it will take for SaaS and cloud applications to become a ‘mainstream’ technology. Taken from that perspective, there was agreement that identity issues around access, authentication and authorization created by SaaS identity ‘silos’ were going to soon become major, and that they need to be reconciled and addressed.  
  • The directory redefined – one of the questions we posed around the future of the corporate directory, and whether enterprises would ever permit it to live in the cloud.  Chris Bedi of VeriSign made the great point that the more relevant and important question is around what a directory really becomes in a cloud-centric environment – where it ends up residing will be a function of how that question is answered.
  • Federated identity – related to the directory point, the group generally also agreed that in a cloud-centric (or even hybrid SaaS/on-prem environment) that there was unlikely to be a monolithic directory or source of identity related data, and that SaaS applications, HR systems and directories (on-prem and cloud) would also likely each contain ‘versions of the truth’ that will need to be synchronized and federated.  Ryan Nichols provided a very interesting example of how Appirio themselves have built a cloud-centric organization with Salesforce.com and Google both providing separate but complementary directory and identity data.
  • Identity done right – Doug Harr made the excellent point that current cloud identity challenges actually offer an opportunity for SMB and midsize enterprises who haven’t been able to invest in identity and systems management technologies to date to ‘get it right’.   IAAS and cloud-based identity management services will likely make these capabilities cost-effective for these target markets for the first time, enabling these organizations to effectively ‘white sheet’ their identity management approaches for both cloud and on-premise applications.

The full recording of the webinar is available and can be access by clicking here.  Please drop us an email as eswg@conformity-inc.com to be added to our mailing list, and to be notified of future Enterprise SaaS Working Group news and events.

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Extending Active Directory to the Cloud

October 17, 2009

One of the use cases we’re almost universally supporting across our midsize enterprise customer base here at Conformity is integration with Microsoft Active Directory (AD), and providing the ability to extend and link employee, role and organizational data with identity stores contained in leading SaaS applications such as Salesforce.com, NetSuite, Google Apps and others. With our AD connector, customers of the Conformity platform are extending capabilities today in two major areas:

  • User provisioning / deprovisioning – by normalizing and synchronizing role and permissions models across AD and Conformity and through deploying our event monitoring capabilities customers can automate user provisioning, deprovisioning and change management activities.    When a new employee is onboarded and set up within AD, access and permissions to cloud services appropriate for the employee’s role are automatically provisioned via Conformity.  For example, when a new outside sales rep joins the organization, when added in AD they then can also be provisioned against Salesforce.com, Xactly and Google Apps with appropriate access and permissions.   When the sales rep changes title or role, or leaves the organization, changes in AD also then trigger appropriate changes in cloud application access and permissions.  In effect, we’re providing users a cloud provisioning extension for AD that enables IT to extend access policies and controls to the cloud.
  • Chargeback models – integration of department and other organizational identifiers between AD and Conformity’s role model also streamlines our customers ability to automate extension of internal chargeback and financial management models to cloud applications.  By linking SaaS administrative siloes to AD  via Conformity, enterprises can track and manage departmental usage not just at the application level, but also within specific modules within the cloud services themselves.

In addition to dramatically reducing administrative headaches, synchronizing and normalizing identity data across AD and major cloud applications is also enabling them to streamline audit prep activities, reduce operational costs and strengthen access control and security.  More to come on this…

Recap: The Enterprise SaaS Working Group

October 1, 2009

It’s been an exciting few days here at Conformity after our recent GA announcement and the kickoff of the Enterprise SaaS Working Group yesterday.  We had a very lively, engaging debate on the key issues the group believes need to be addressed for SaaS and cloud applications to become ‘mainstream’ technologies in the enterprises.  The group featured a diverse set of executive perspectives from cloud vendors, thought leaders and practitioners, and included:

A quick highlight of some of the discussion yesterday:

  • PaaS/SaaS – which model ‘wins’ in the enterprise? While opinions differed, a common sentiment shared by the panel was that there’s not going to be ‘right answer’ for all organizations.  Depending on the industry vertical, business process or IT management model PaaS or SaaS could be the ‘right answer’, and in many situations organizations could have PaaS and SaaS offerings sitting side by side.   
  • Private clouds – part of the answer or indicative of SaaS market immaturity? As with the PaaS/SaaS discussion a common theme was ‘it depends’.  The core advantage to SaaS and cloud delivery models is the ability to share resources – what part of the stack organizations decide they’d like to share will likely be driven primarily by security concerns and issues.  A likely scenario, as with PaaS/SaaS, is that different models will likely be adopted by different types of organizations depending on security and operational requirements.
  • Enterprise SaaS adoption – when does it overtake on-premise? Two different perspectives were discussed around when SaaS will overtake on-premise apps in the enterprise.   A common belief of the group was that SaaS is winning in a majority of new deals in the enterprise today, with the perspective shared that 50-75% of enterprises would ‘flip the switch’ on cloud in some manner by approximately 2012.  Peter Coffee of Salesforce also shared his belief that total installed base for SaaS would outnumber on-premise apps by 2020, though there would also likely be 1-2% of the market that would be ‘holdouts’.
  • Any applications that SaaS/cloud won’t be able to penetrate? If architected and deployed correctly, there are no perceived areas in which SaaS and cloud application models could not be leveraged with Peter Coffee of Salesforce , Tom Fisher of SuccessFactors and Ryan Nichols of Appirio all providing compelling examples of large scale, transaction intensive customer deployments.

The full recording of the webinar is available and can be access by clicking here.  Also, Ryan Nichols at Appirio had a great post on their perspective on our discussion topics here.

Please drop us an email as eswg@conformity-inc.com to be added to our mailing list, and to be notified of future Enterprise SaaS Working Group news and events.

Conformity Announces GA Release of First Enterprise-Class Management Platform for SaaS and Cloud Apps

September 30, 2009

We’re excited to announce today the general availability of the Conformity solution, which provides customers the first enterprise-class management platform for cloud applications and users.  The Conformity solution is designed to arm enterprises with the same level of visibility and control over on-demand applications as they’ve come to expect with traditional packaged apps.  With our solution, enterprises can now be confident bringing new cloud applications into their business environments, knowing there will no longer be compromises made in the areas of management processes, insight and control.  With today’s GA, enterprises can:

  • Increase data security and reduce compliance risks
  • Optimize license allocation and expenses
  • Automate and streamline administration
  • Expand and extend enterprise usage of SaaS and cloud applications

Specific capabilities of the Conformity solution include:

  • User provisioning – provides centralized point of provisioning and deprovisioning of users accounts within cloud applications, and ongoing management of user permissions and authorizations.
  • Role and profile management – enables organizations to centrally manage cloud application roles, profiles and permissions through normalized permission models, and maps policies to users and roles.
  • Approval workflows – provides auditable cross-functional approval processes for users requiring new or amended access permissions, or role and profile changes.
  • Directory integration – enables organizations to seamlessly synchronize Conformity’s user repository with on-premise directory services.
  • Compliance reporting – provides reports required for effective preparation for audits for SOX, HIPAA, PCI and other regulatory mandates and standards.
  • Usage analytics – provides visibility, analytics and reporting on cloud application and license utilization.
  • Change management – enables archiving, management and recovery of application configurations and role models.

The Conformity platform provides templates, tools and workflow needed to manage all cloud applications in a customer’s environment.  Conformity also provides additional analytics, reporting and provisioning automation through integrations with the following leading cloud applications:

The Conformity platform also supports directory integration for Microsoft Active Directory, and is compatible with industry standards such as SPML, SAML and WS-Federation.

Please click here to read the full announcement, and stay tuned for more upcoming news!!!

SaaS – What’s in store for 2008?

January 5, 2008

Over the Holidays we saw a number of interesting articles and posts predicting that in 2008 SaaS will begin to go ‘mainstream’, resulting in a surge of demand for SaaS and On-Demand applications (for two of the better commentaries see Phil Wainewright’s great post on the Eight reasons SaaS will surge in 2008 and Jeff Kaplan’s Top Ten Reasons Why On-Demand Services will Soar in 2008). Some of the more compelling drivers of a potential breakout year (in terms of adoption and awareness) for SaaS in 2008?

  • Macroeconomic backdrop – the prospects of recession (which appear to be higher by the day) could actually drive increased demand for SaaS applications. The lower cost, more flexible SaaS subscription model will become even more attractive to organizations as capital budgets are cut and cost pressures increase. If organizations also accelerate office virtualization efforts in face of increasing cost pressures, SaaS will demand will benefit.
  • The heavyweights appear – 2007 saw not only large on-premise incumbents such as SAP, Oracle and others diving into the SaaS market, but also the introduction of major utility computing services from Amazon (EC2), IBM and Google, increasing the overall momentum towards SaaS that is sure to spill over into 2008.
  • Enterprise adoption – data from Salesforce.com and other SaaS vendors (as well as our own anecdotal evidence) suggests that enterprises are becoming increasingly accepting of the SaaS model, due both to the traditional cost and support benefits of the model over on-premise software and to the increasing push towards SOA and web services models. Enterprise adoption, if it follows the mid-market pattern, will accelerate significantly over the next 12-18 months.
  • Wall Street takes notice – with successful IPOs from NetSuite and SuccessFactors (and several more in the pipeline), initiation of M&A activity in the SaaS space with Cisco’s acquisition of Webex, and valuations that reflect substantially higher multiples than traditional on-premise software vendors, investors are quickly taking notice of the SaaS opportunity.

We believe that 2008 may also be the year that ‘the other shoe drops’ for SaaS – when offerings and adoption proliferates to a point where management of SaaS applications becomes a challenge at both the organizational and departmental level…

New Microsoft SaaS offerings

October 4, 2007

Microsoft earlier this week announced the availability of SaaS versions of Exchange, SharePoint and Forefront, as well as a new SaaS-only unified messaging service named Office Communication Server. Interestingly, the offerings are not targeted at traditional mid-market adopters of SaaS, but instead at organizations buying a minimum of 5,000 licenses. An effort to fend off Google in the enterprise???